The Ultimate Guide for Independently Published Authors – Chapter 1

Author Don Massenzio

ultimate guideIntroduction

This book is something that was put together over the past year as I navigated my way through the world of independent publishing. A lot of this voyage was guided by trial and error. I spent a great deal of time and a minimal amount of money determining what works and what doesn’t. Have I mastered everything involved in the independent publishing platform? Not at all. I still have a lot to learn.

I put together this book to help others who are either beginners or seasoned in the area of independent publishing. I have compiled my own experiences and ask that you use this book as a set of guidelines gathered from one person’s experience. I welcome a productive discussion around the topics in this book and view it as a dynamic tool that I will adjust as I learn more on my own and from you as…

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Five effective strategies for pacing when you’re sick or in pain

by Toni Bernhard
posted Jun 15, 2016 on Psychology Today & kevinmd.com April 5, 2017

Pacing refers to spacing out your activities during the day so that you’re able to stay within the limits of what your body can handle without exacerbating your symptoms. Another way to think of it is that pacing is a way to keep you inside your “energy envelope” — the envelope that contains your energy stores for any given day.

First, an admission: Even though pacing may be the single best “treatment” for me, I have a love-hate relationship with it. On the one hand, I love pacing because it keeps my symptoms from flaring. On the other hand, I hate pacing because it keeps me from doing everything I want to do.

To complicate matters, I’m much better at pacing when I’m at my best, as opposed to when I’m at my worst. This means that when I’m feeling intensely sick or in pain, I tend to ignore pacing and overdo things which, of course, only exacerbates my symptoms. Why in the world would I do this? Because doing things distracts me from my symptoms. In other words, activity keeps me from tuning in to how my body feels. Of course, this always backfires. The time comes when my body imposes itself on the situation and tells me in no uncertain terms: “That is enough for now.” Then, when I do give in and lie down to rest, I have to deal with feeling worse due to all that extra activity. When will I learn? …

For more on this article and the list of strategies go to: https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/turning-straw-gold/201606/pacing-the-chronically-ill-person-s-best-friend or
http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2017/04/5-effective-strategies-pacing-youre-sick-pain.html

 

About the author: Toni Bernhard was a law professor at the University of California—Davis. She is the author of How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and their Caregivers, How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow, and How to Live Well with Chronic Pain and Illness: A Mindful Guide. She can be found online at her self-titled site, Toni Bernhard.

It’s a dog’s life

An Englishman went on safari in Zambia, taking his faithful corgi along for company. One day the corgi decided to go do some exploring on her own.

As she was wandering around, she saw a leopard approaching with the obvious intention of having her for lunch. Just in time, she noticed some bones on the ground …

Source: It’s a dog’s life

EDITING 101: 33 – Research – How Much is Enough or How Much is Too Much?

Research is imperative, whatever the genre. Being aware of utilising the research into the story rather than an ‘info dump’ because you’ve spent time researching and you don’t want to waste it (time or info). How much researched information will enhance your story?

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

Originally posted as the Dun Writin’—Now Whut? series on this blog, EDITING 101 is a weekly refresher series for some of you and brand new for others.

Courtesy ofAdirondack Editing

Research – How Much is Enough or How Much is Too Much?

Once your first draft is completed, you might decide there are areas that you need to research. How long a body will keep in a refrigerator, for instance. Or how apt someone is to be struck by lightning while jogging through San Francisco’s Golden Gate Park in July. Or whether or not the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City is uptown or downtown from where your main character is. There are many details that writers have to research to make sure they are correct.

Just like anything, some authors love to research and others hate it. Those who love it can get lost in researching, using…

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